Rocketry Software for Students

Rocket Science or Aerospace Engineering is the engineering field that covers the development of spacecraft.

This page is oriented to providing pointers to software that can help with rocketry. The software referenced here is all either free, inexpensive, or demo software so it can be tried without initially investing significant money. Where possible we've included a link to the site where you can get the latest version rather than a direct download of a possibly stale version.

If you want to learn about rocketry, check out

As mentioned in other pages on this web site, launch systems typically use chemical rockets. Rockets use fuels that go through a chemical reaction to release energy. This released energy heats the exhaust gas creating a lot of pressure in the rocket engine combustion chamger. This pressurized gas is guided by the rocket engine nozzle into a high-speed exhaust stream which produces thrust. The force of this thrust works against the force of gravity which pulls a rocket towards the surface of Earth (or other planets). Once a rocket is moving through the atmosphere, there's also a force of drag on the rocket. Thus the acceleration of a rocket depends on multiple forces acting on it, which includes:
     a = Ft / m      for rocket thrust
where Ft is the force of the rocket thrust, and m is the mass of the rocket
     a = ( Cd * p * A * v^2 / 2 ) / m      for drag
where Cd is drag coefficient, p is the density of the atmosphere, A is the cross sectional area, v is the velocity, and m is the mass of the rocket
     a = 9.8      for gravity

Also, noted on other pages on this web site, launch systems typically use chemical rockets to accelerate spacecraft to Earth orbit or farther. Rockets use fuels that go through a chemical reaction to release energy. This released energy heats the exhaust gas creating a lot of pressure in the rocket engine combustion chamger. This pressurized gas is guided by the rocket engine nozzle into a high-speed exhaust stream which causes the rocket acceleration. Some common rocket fuels are:

In addition to liquid propellant chemical rockets and solid propellant chemical rockets, once off the Earth's surface, spacecraft can use electric propulsion (aka ion thrusters) or solar sails (aka light sails). In the case of ion thrusters, instead of heated gas creating pressure that is guided into a high-speed exhaust stream they use electric charge to accelerate particles into a high-speed exhaust stream which causes the spacecraft to accelerate in the opposite direction. In the case of solar sails, photons of light, typically from the Sun, are reflected causing acceleration in the opposite direction.


software links

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